International speakers



EDGAR PIETERSE

South African Research Chair in Urban Policy & Director of African Centre for Cities


Edgar Pieterse is holder of the NRF South African Research Chair in Urban Policy. He also directs the African Centre for Cities at the University of Cape Town. He is a founder member of Isandla Institute, serves on the Boards of Magnet Theatre, the Sustainability Institute and the Cape Town Partnership; and also serves on the Council of the University of the Western Cape. His research stems from the borderzone between geography, planning and cultural studies with a strong orientation towards political philosophy. Professor Pieterse holds a PhD from London School of Economics, an MA in Development Studies from the Institute of Social Studies (The Hague, The Netherlands) and BA-Honours from the University of the Western Cape.

Twitter
Website




JODI DEAN

Professor, Department of Political Science, Hobart and William Smith Colleges


Jodi Dean is a professor in the Political Science department at Hobart and William Smith Colleges. She has also held the position of Erasmus Professor of the Humanities in the Faculty of Philosophy at Erasmus University Rotterdam. Drawing from Marxism, psychoanalysis, and post-structuralism, she has made major contributions to contemporary political theory, media theory, feminist theory, and cultural studies, most significantly in her account of communicative capitalism as the merger of democracy and capitalism into a single formation. She received her BA in History from Princeton University her MA, MPhil, and PhD from Columbia University. She is the author of numerous books and articles and has given invited lectures in Austria, Belgium, Canada, China, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Denmark, England, Germany, Holland, Ireland, Italy, Jordan, Norway, Peru, Russia, and at colleges and universities throughout the United States.

Twitter
Website




ROGER KEIL

Professor, Faculty of Environmental Studies, York University


Roger Keil is Professor at the Faculty of Environmental Studies at York University in Toronto. A former director of York University’s City Institute, he researches global suburbanization, cities and infectious disease, and regional governance. As Principal Investigator of a Major Collaborative Research Initiative on “Global Suburbanisms: Governance, Land and Infrastructure in the 21st Century” (2010-2017), he works with 50 researchers and 18 partner organizations worldwide. A recipient of the President’s Research Excellence Award in 2013, he is the editor of Suburban Constellations (Jovis 2013), Suburban Governance: A Global View (with Pierre Hamel, UTP) and the author of Global Suburbs (Polity – in preparation), as well as being the co-editor of several other publications and a past co-editor of the International Journal of Urban and Regional Research (IJURR) and a co-founder of the International Network for Urban Research and Action (INURA).

Twitter
Website




ANDY MERRIFIELD

Supernumerary Fellow in Human Geography, Murray Edwards College, University of Cambridge


Andy Merrifield is a writer, social theorist, and urban geographer. He has taught human geography at the University of Southampton, King's College, London, and Clark University in Massachusetts, USA, and has been a visiting scholar at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil, the University of Manchester (as Leverhulme Visiting Professor), and the City University of New York (CUNY). For a number of years, he was a freelance writer living in France, where he wrote biographies of Guy Debord and Henri Lefebvre, as well as a bestselling ‘existential’ travelogue, The Wisdom of Donkeys. He is author of nine books; his articles, essays, and reviews have appeared in the Times, The Nation, Harper's Magazine, New Left Review, Adbusters, Harvard Design Magazine, Radical Philosophy, Monthly Review, and Dissent, amongst others. He is currently Supernumerary Fellow in Human Geography at Murray Edwards College, University of Cambridge.

Twitter
Website




JASON MOORE

Assistant Professor of Sociology at Binghamton University & Coordinator of the World-Ecology Research Network


Jason Moore is assistant professor of sociology at Binghamton University, and coordinator of the World-Ecology Research Network. He writes frequently on the history of capitalism in Europe, Latin America, and the United States, from the long sixteenth century to the neoliberal era. His research has been recognized with the Braverman Award of the Society for the Study of Social Problems (1999); the Bernstein and Byres Prize in Agrarian Studies (2011); the Distinguished Scholarship Award of the American Sociological Association’s Political Economy of the World-System Section (2002, and 2011 honorable mention); and the Alice Hamilton Prize of the American Society for Environmental History (2004). His Capitalism in the Web of Life: Ecology and the Accumulation of Capital will be published with Verso in July, 2015. He is presently completing Ecology and the rise of capitalism, an environmental history of the rise of capitalism, for the University of California Press.

Twitter
Website




MALINI RANGANATHAN

Assistant Professor, School of International Service, American University


Malini Ranganathan is an interdisciplinary geographer with a special interest in postcolonial urbanism. Her scholarship on the politics and discourses surrounding urban infrastructure and ‘natures’ seeks to enrich what we know about capitalism, citizenship, and sustainability in the world's most rapidly urbanizing regions. Her research is published in the International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Urban Geography, Antipode: A Radical Journal of Geography, and Water Alternatives among other leading journals, as well as several edited books on the South Asian city. Previously, Dr Ranganathan was a post-doctoral fellow based out of the Department of Geography at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. She has also worked at TERI, New Delhi; ENDA-Tiers Monde, Dakar; and the Asian Development Bank, Manila. She is currently a tenure-track Assistant Professor in the Global Environmental Politics program in the School of International Service at American University, Washington, DC.

Twitter
Website




NIK HEYNEN

Professor, Department of Geography, University of Georgia


Nik Heynen is a professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Georgia. He is also Honorary Senior Research Fellow in the School of Environment and Development at the University of Manchester. His research interests include urban geography; urban political ecology; environmental justice; urban social movements; poverty/inequality; science and technology studies; hunger/food studies; and intersectional studies of race, class and gender. He holds a PhD in Geography from Indiana University and has held several editorial and advisory positions in prominent academic journals and organisations. He has also written many scholarly articles and book chapters, and is co-editor (with N. Castree, M. Wright, W. Larner and P. Chatterton) of The Point is to Change It: Geographies of Hope and Survival in an Age of Crisis (Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishers, 2010), among several other books.

Twitter
Website




NEIL BRENNER

Professor of Urban Theory, Harvard Graduate School of Design


Neil Brenner is Professor of Urban Theory and Director of the Urban Theory Lab at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. He previously served as Professor of Sociology and Metropolitan Studies, and as an affiliated faculty member of the American Studies Program, at New York University. He holds a PhD in Political Science from the University of Chicago; an MA in Geography from UCLA; and a BA in Philosophy, Summa Cum Laude, from Yale College. Brenner’s writing and teaching focus on the theoretical, conceptual and methodological dimensions of urban questions. His work builds upon, and seeks to extend, the fields of critical urban and regional studies, comparative geopolitical economy and radical sociospatial theory. In addition to being the author of several books and edited volumes, he has also written many scholarly articles and book chapters on topics related to urban theory, spatial theory, spatialized political economy and method, a number of which have been translated into other languages.

Twitter
Website




MARIA KAIKA

Professor of Human Geography, School of Environment and Development, University of Manchester


Maria Kaika is Professor of Human Geography at the University of Manchester. She holds a D.Phil. in Geography from the University of Oxford, and an MA in Architecture from the National Technical University of Athens, as well as professional qualifications as an architect. Her research on urban political ecology, urban infrastructures, and environmental politics focuses on breaking down the binary between nature and the city, and contributes to the promotion of a dialogue between urban studies, geography, environmental studies and architecture. She is author of City of Flows: modernity, nature and the city (New York: Routledge, 2005) and co-editor (with N. Heynen and E. Swyngedouw) of In the Nature of Cities: Urban Political Ecology and the Politics of Urban Metabolism (London: Routledge, 2006). In addition to delivering public lectures, plenaries and keynotes for national and international audiences, Dr Kaika sits on the editorial and advisory boards of several planning journals, and was appointed City of Vienna Visiting Professor in 2012.

Twitter
Website




MARCO ARMIERO

Director of Environmental Humanities Laboratory, KTH Royal Institute of Technology


Marco Armiero (PhD in Economic History) is an environmental historian and director of the Environmental Humanities Laboratory at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm. He is one of the founders of the environmental history field in Europe, authoring, among other works, the first Italian textbook on the subject. His main topics of study have been environmental conflicts, uses of natural resources, politicization of nature and landscape, and the environmental effects of mass migrations. In English, he has published the book A Rugged Nation: Mountains and the Making of Modern Italy (2011). He is also the author of several articles and special issues in Environment and History, Left History, Radical History Review, and Capitalism Nature Socialism. Before moving to the KTH EHL, he has held the position of post-doctoral fellow and visiting scholar at Yale University, UC Berkeley, Stanford, the Autonomous University in Barcelona, and the Center for Social Sciences at the University of Coimbra, Portugal.

Twitter
Website




GARTH MYERS

Urban International Studies, Trinity College


Garth Myers is a geographer with expertise in urban planning and African area studies. He has conducted research in Kenya, Tanzania, Malawi, Zambia, Senegal, South Africa, Finland, and the UK over the past 20 years. His research interests include African urban geography and urban planning, comparative urbanism and comparative urban land politics, urban political ecology and environmental justice as well as urban environmental governance. His book African Cities: Alternative Visions of Urban Theory and Practice (Zed, 2011) uses African urban concepts and experiences to speak back to theoretical and practical concerns in urban studies and disciplines that study cities, as well as in African studies. It argues for a re-vision a seeing again, and a revising of how cities in Africa are discussed and written about in both urban studies and African studies, encouraging African studies and urban studies scholars across the world to engage with the vibrancy and complexity of African cities with fresh eyes.

Twitter
Website




RICHARD WALKER

Professor of Geography, University of California, Berkeley


Richard Walker is professor of geography at UC Berkeley, and co-founder and current chair of the California Studies Association, as well as chair of the campus’s California Studies Center. He has written extensively about economic and urban geography, as well as environmental policy, and taken the odd foray into philosophy. He is co-author of The Capitalist Imperative: Territory, Technology and Industrial Growth (Oxford: Blackwell, 1989) and The New Social Economy: Reworking the Division of Labor (Cambridge USA: Blackwell, 1992). Most recently, his focus has been on the regional peculiarities of California, which he considers to be one of the most important economic, political and cultural hearths of world capitalism, and one of the least studied. Walker's 2004 book, The Conquest of Bread: 150 Years of Agribusiness in California, recounts the state's transformation into the nation's leading agrarian production complex, its ‘bread basket’. He received a BA in economics from Stanford University and a PhD in geography and environmental engineering from Johns Hopkins University.

Twitter
Website




HENRIK ERNSTSON

Research Fellow at KTH Environmental Humanities Laboratory and Honorary Visiting Scholar at African Centre for Cities, University of Cape Town


Dr. Henrik Ernstson has developed a core interest in urban political ecology, social-ecological studies, collective action, and comparative urbanism. His work aims to unpack the inherently political dimensions of urban environments and ecologies and how they are reworked through collective action. Through his extensive international collaboration with co-workers in South Africa, UK, Italy, USA and Sweden, he aims to establish more situated and place-sensitive analyses and understandings of ecologies, including their relations to power, equality and democracy. He is Research Fellow at the KTH Environmental Humanities at KTH Institute of Technology in Stockholm, and Honorary Visiting Scholar the African Centre for Cities, University of Cape Town where he leads in-depth studies of contested urban ecologies in Cape Town (South Africa), New Orleans (USA) and Stockholm (Sweden). He was recently the Stig Hagström scholar (2013-2015) of The Wallenberg Foundation at the Department of History, Stanford University.

Twitter
Website Publications




ERIK SWYNGEDOUW

Professor of Geography, School of Environment and Development, University of Manchester


Erik Swyngedouw is Professor of Geography at Manchester University. He was professor of Geography at Oxford University and Fellow of St. Peter’s College until 2006. He holds a PhD in Geography and Environmental Engineering from the Johns Hopkins University and Masters in Urban Planning and in Agricultural Engineering from the University of Leuven, Belgium. He has held visiting professorships at the Universities of Seville, Spain, the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, the Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium, the University of Washington, Seattle, and York University, Toronto. His research interests include political-ecology, urban governance, democracy and political power, water and water resources, the political-economy of capitalist societies, urban social and political struggles, the dynamics of urban and regional change, and the politics of globalisation. He has published over 50 papers on these themes. Some of his recent books include Liquid Power: Contested Hydro-Modernities in Twentieth-Century Spain (Cambridge: MIT Press, 2015) and Designing the Post-Political city and the Insurgent Polis. Civic City Cahier 5 (London: Bedford Press, 2011).

Twitter
Website

join the conversation!

CONTACT
Kajsa Nordin at Teater Reflex (+46 70-461 09 40, kajsa@teaterreflex.se)
or Henrik Ernstson at KTH (+46 70-044 82 04, ernstson@kth.se)